1064 Chapel Street, New Haven, CT 06510         203 777 7760

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ROSALIND BRODOFF 1926-2017

Rosalind Brodoff was born in Bronx NY, January 11, 1926, the second of 6 children, 4 sisters and one brother.  Although they lived an impoverished lifestyle during the depression, the children learned to improvise, nurturing their creative spirits.  After Rosalind married in 1953, she moved to Connecticut where she and her husband Stanley raised  4 children. She had few friends and devoted her time to her children and her art. She was in constant creative pursuit, making quilts, braided rugs, needlepoints, knitting, drawing and of course, pursuing her love of painting.  Country life intrigued her, and through her everyday encounters, she befriended local merchants, admired their humanity, seeing humor and intrigue in their stories. Rosalind  became a story teller through her paintings, most of which depicted the local merchants in their places of business. Most were immigrants whose personal journeys to this country were depicted through subtle symbolic references in her paintings. 

The durability of wood appealed to her, resulting in a body of work on solid wooden panels. Despite her social interactions with those she met through her husband, she saw these merchants as the heart and soul of her community. After her 23 year marriage dissolved, Rosalind’s life took a painful turn. She became increasingly more isolated, feeling victimized by her circumstances. She never able to emotionally recovered as she watched her family fall apart.  Rosalind also possessed an undeniable warmth and an infectious spirit, her vulnerability, charm, intelligence, and beauty were expressed with unequaled allure. She was an incurable dreamer, never losing hope for the future. She spent the better part of 40 years immersed into her work, creating a body of work chronicling her local American scene, the fabric of her life.  Until the day she died, she had her daily swim and then retreated to her home where she continued to paint. Without adequate resources for art supplies Rosalind found whatever supplies were available to continue her creative pursuits, every scrap of paper was put to good use. Unfortunately, on July 8, 2017, Rosalind’s dreams for the future vanished, she died suddenly, alone in her home at the age of 91, surrounded by a body of work that will remain her legacy for generations to come.